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8 types of breads and their origin

Discover the secrets that the most popular daily menu hides

It is the most common food we eat and is present in any of the meals, either in the form of a sandwich, as an appetizer with a dip or in rolls when they go with the main dishes. The types of breads are endless and vary according to the cereal with which they are made or the modifications made to them in their place of origin. Often giving different names to the same type of bread.

In this way, we present eight types of fairly common breads and their country of origin.

Baguette

Originally from France, it is long bread made with wheat flour. Its popularity is due to a 1920 law that allowed bakers not to start work before four in the morning. This exclude the possibility to have the large breads they used to make ready for breakfast time, while the baguette was cooked faster. In Venezuela there is ‘canilla’ bread as a variation, while the original baguette is known as ‘French bread’.

Cheese bread

Made with cassava flour (cassava) and cheese, this bread comes from the culinary traditions of Brazil. Some historians suggest that it dates back to the 19th century, when the flour in the kitchens was of poor quality. The cooks managed to replace it with cassava flour and took advantage of the cheese that was left over to prepare the cheese bread for their masters.

Pita

It is a very common bread in the countries of the Middle East, where it comes from. In Western countries, its popularity is given by Arab immigration at the beginning of the 20th century and, more recently, by the boom of kebabs or shawarmas. This flatbread is also traditional in India and Greece, while in African countries they use it as a kind of fork, to put food in their mouths.

Casabe

It is unleavened bread, which does not carry yeast. Made of cassava flour and roasted in a Budare or grill. The casabe is a food of indigenous origin, specifically from the tribes located in Central America and in the north of South America. It is usually eaten accompanied by cheese.

Payés

Bread The name may not be so common, but Payés bread is often called peasant bread. It comes from the rural areas of Catalonia, from which it derives its name, Payés, which means peasant. As the crust is harder than the rest of the breads, the inside stays soft for more days.

Mantou

The round, sweet bread that is served with Chinese food and that fascinates many is called the Mantou.

It is made with wheat flour and steamed and then, sometimes, fried. There are also variations in which some bread is stuffed by for example, meat.

Sandwich Bread

This sliced bread is, perhaps, the most common of the breads and used especially when preparing a sandwich. Sliced bread is simply a product of the industrialization of the early twentieth century, when the invention of the bread slicing machine revolutionized the bakery industry. The fact that the bread was sold already cut perfectly suited the increasingly hectic routine of people, who had less time for their meals.

Cornbread

Cornbread is very popular in American cuisine. Its preparation of cornmeal is quite fast, since it is not necessary to let the dough rise, it is only cooked in a pan once it is ready.

Make it a perfect meal with our Salmon Tartarehere you can find the step by step recipe.

End this amazing meal with a Black and White Chocolate Trufflesclick here to see the complete recipe.

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Autor del artículo
Manu Balanzino
Chef, sumiller y asesor gastronómico. Experto en gestión de Alimentos y Bebidas en el sector de la Hostelería, se encuentra inmerso en labores de asesoramiento a restaurantes en el desarrollo de cartas, vinos, destilados y control de costes. A su vez, asesora a numerosas marcas del sector agroalimentario. Su formación en el sector Servicios comienza en la Escuela de Hostelería de Benalmádena, para posteriormente ampliar sus conocimientos, cursando la "Diplomatura en Gestión de Alimentos y Bebidas" en CIOMijas, y el "Certificado Profesional de Sommelier Internacional" por ESHOB. Manu Balanzino es un apasionado del mundo de la comunicación, y ha fundado el periódico digital de gastronomía, The Gourmet Journal, una publicación referencial del ámbito gastronómico la cual dirige. Además, es colaborador experto en gastronomía en revistas especializadas como Andalucía de Viaje, El Gourmet (AMC Networks International Latin America) y Diario Sur. En radio, conduce el programa "Momentos Gourmets" en COPE y en televisión, colabora en Canal Cocina, RTV Marbella y Fuengirola TV.

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