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Bergen, lovely Norwegian coast

Fish and seafood, fresh product markets and historic restaurants

Located in western Norway, Bergen is the second largest city in the country, caught between mountain slopes and the waters of the North Sea. Founded 950 years ago and linked to the Viking Age, this gateway to the Norwegian fjords was for centuries a center of trade with the rest of Europe as a member of the Hanseatic League, a commercial and defensive collaboration between Germany and the Baltic Sea areas, Sweden, Poland and Russia.

Bergen is famous for the seven mountains that surround the center and is the starting point to discover Norway for its location between the Hardanger Fjord and Sognefjord.

The base of the cuisine is seafood dishes with fish and seafood from the cold waters that surround the place, from the traditional soup of the city, Bergen Fiskesuppe, to the røkerumpe made with smoked and salted cod accompanied by a sauce of nutmeg and tubers, or the popular persetorsk, marinated cod loin typical for Christmas dinners.

If you travel in September, you can enjoy the Bergen Food Festival, which takes place in one of the oldest fortresses in Norway, the Bergenhus Festning. There is no shortage of apple juice, Hardanger cider, craft beer or regional cheeses.

Bryggen, el antiguo muelle de la liga Hanseática
Bryggen, the old pier

Named a Creative City of Gastronomy by Unesco, since the 13th century it has had a fish market, today located in a modern building, the Torghallen. Here fish and shellfish are displayed in large display cases that can be prepared and consumed on the spot. We must not stop trying XXL sea urchins and various molluscs.

On the pier, a few meters from the market, there are open-air food stalls, including one dedicated to freshly caught seafood. Next to it, a gastronomic market with local products such as reindeer or deer sausages.

Fisketorget, the fish market in Bergen

Since the 13th century, Bergen has had a fish market by the sea in the modern building, Torghallen, which also houses the city’s tourist office. In this place, the visitor can find numerous of fish and shellfish throughout its large display cases, which can be prepared instantly and consumed. Be sure to try XXL sea urchins and various molluscs.

History on the plate

In Bryggen, the former pier of the Hanseatic League, is situated the Bryggen Tracteursted, the oldest restaurant in the city, dating back to 1708.

A selection of Norwegian tapas is served here, the so-called smakfulle småtterier, consisting of trays with variety of smoked fish, pickles, sausage and local specialties, breads and sauces. To get there, you have to enter between wooden houses with colored facades where the pulleys used by the people to carry the merchandise that arrived at the port are still preserved. This area, one of the claims of the city, is a World Heritage Site.

Bergen ha sido nombrada Ciudad Creativa de la Gastronomía por la Unesco
Bergen, Named a Creative City of Gastronomy by Unesco

Bare Vestland

Located in the Vagsallmenningen square in honor of the writer Ludvig Holberg, the Bare Vestland restaurant offers a menu of traditional food based on the season with proposals such as plukkfish, a dish that is made by boiling the hake and then crumbling it together with cooked and mashed potatoes that is served with pickled onion and crispy bacon on top.

In addition, fresh fish and other specialties such as local lamb, meat stew with beer, smoked herring with duck egg and potato pie or cheeses.

Breakfast, the most important meal

The Scandic Torget hotel is famous for worshiping the best breakfast tradition in Bergen. Sausages, salmon in various forms, brunost (sweet goat cheese) and caviar, actually tube fish roe paste.

How to get there?

Norwegian Airlines offers direct flights from Spain. From the airport to the city center, there is a bus and its duration is approximately 30 minutes.

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Autor del artículo
Manu Balanzino
Chef, sumiller y asesor gastronómico. Experto en gestión de Alimentos y Bebidas en el sector de la Hostelería, se encuentra inmerso en labores de asesoramiento a restaurantes en el desarrollo de cartas, vinos, destilados y control de costes. A su vez, asesora a numerosas marcas del sector agroalimentario. Su formación en el sector Servicios comienza en la Escuela de Hostelería de Benalmádena, para posteriormente ampliar sus conocimientos, cursando la "Diplomatura en Gestión de Alimentos y Bebidas" en CIOMijas, y el "Certificado Profesional de Sommelier Internacional" por ESHOB. Manu Balanzino es un apasionado del mundo de la comunicación, y ha fundado el periódico digital de gastronomía, The Gourmet Journal, una publicación referencial del ámbito gastronómico la cual dirige. Además, es colaborador experto en gastronomía en revistas especializadas como Andalucía de Viaje, El Gourmet (AMC Networks International Latin America) y Diario Sur. En radio, conduce el programa "Momentos Gourmets" en COPE y en televisión, colabora en Canal Cocina, RTV Marbella y Fuengirola TV.

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